28.10.08

DIZZY

"I'm so dizzy...my head is spinning..."
As Vic reeves put it in 1991.

I hit my head a week ago on the way
down to the basement and have been
feeling a bit dizzy since then.

First I was worried that I might've re-triggred
the Labyrinthitis (ear infection) which
I had Xmas 2006, but fingers
crossed it hasn't started.

I just feel a bit woozy and out of sorts
so I'm going to take a couple of days off.
At worst I've got mild concussion and
the treatment is to do nothing and
let the old grey matter rest.

Normal service will return ASAP.


27.10.08

FUNNY CAT PIC
OF THE DAY

"Pink string! Yayyy!"


NICE MOOD PIC
OF THE DAY

Condensation on my
window last night.


FIRE

A new study shows that humans had
the ability to make fire nearly 790,000
years ago, a skill that helped them
migrate from Africa to Europe.

By analysing flints at an archaeological
site on the bank of the river Jordan,
researchers at Israel's Hebrew University
discovered that early civilizations had
learned to light fires, a turning point
that allowed them to venture
into unknown lands.

A previous study of the site published
in 2004 showed that man had been able
to control fire - for example transferring it
by means of burning branches but
researchers now say that ancient man
could actually start fire, rather than
relying on natural phenomena
such as lightning.


The new study, published in a recent
edition of
Quaternary Science Reviews,
mapped 12 archaeological layers at
Gesher Benot Yaaqov in northern Israel.


"The new data shows there was a continued,
controlled use of fire through many
civilizations and that they were not
dependent on natural fires,"
archaeologist Nira Alperson-Afil
said on Sunday.


While they did not find remnants of ancient
matches or lighters, Alperson-Afil said
the patterns of burnt flint found in the
same place throughout 12 civilizations
was evidence of fire-making ability,
though the methods used
were unclear.

Because the site is located in the Jordan
valley - a key route between Africa and
Europe - it also provides evidence
of the human migration.

"Once they mastered fire to protect themselves
from predators and provide warmth and
light, they were secure enough to move
into and populate unfamiliar
territory," Alperson-Afil said.


LEO THE
FIRE HERO

A dog has risked its life to protect
four kittens trapped in a house
fire in Melbourne, Australia.

Firefighters found Leo guarding the
newborn litter which were
in a cardboard box in
one of the bedrooms.

When the fire broke out inside the
house, the family of four plus their
other dog managed to escape.


However Leo paid the price for his bravery.
He succumbed to the smoke and heat
but
firefighters rushed the unconscious
dog to safety and revived him with
a heart massage and oxygen.

"Leo wouldn't leave the kittens and
it nearly cost him his life," fire
service Commander Ken Brown
told reporters.


The four kittens also survived the
fire and on Sunday Leo, who fire
fighters nicknamed 'Smoky',
was again back at the house.


OCTOBER ART
2008
PART III

Please click on the images
to view a larger version.














OCTOBER 2008
COLOUR
PART II

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to view a larger version.














24.10.08

FREDDIE GETS
RESCUED

Freddie, a 14-year-old Cairn terrier,
became disorientated in the fog while
on a walk in Amble, Northumberland,
with his owner Jean Brigstock.

It slipped into the water as Mrs Brigstock, 73,
searched for it but had no success and
ssumed he was hiding in
a nearby holiday park.

However, Freddie was swimming against
the tide, almost a mile out to sea.
He was
only saved when the two fishermen
spotted what they thought was an
otter, went to investigate
and saw the dog.


They pulled him out and contacted the
coastguard, as they were not due to
return to shore for days, which
sent a boat to retrieve him.


Then, by chance,
Mrs Brigstock 's daughter
Wendy came across the wife of one
of the fishermen, who told her
they had found Freddie.


Mrs Brigstock said: "It was a beautiful day,
and I was taking him on his usual walk,
but all of a sudden, a heavy sea fret set
in quickly, and I couldn't see Freddie
anymore. I looked for him for
hours, and others helped."

"There was no sign of him, but I was
convinced he would eventuallyturn up.
I was desperate. He's my companion and
he's so important to me. We walk
twice a day down on the beach."

"I knew he hated water so I thought he'd
head for the dunes rather than the sea.
It really didn't enter my head that he
would swim. He rarely goes through a
puddle and has an aversion to baths."

"When I found out he had been found all
that way out, I felt frightened. I worried
about what state he would be in. He
looked like a drowned rat when
they found him."

Freddie was taken to the vet but was
unscathed. Mrs Brigstock added: "The
night he was rescued, he was a little
bit under the weather. He was quite
quiet and feeling sorry for himself.
But the next morning h was
ready for his breakfast."


NICE COLOURS
OF THE DAY

OCTOBER ART
2008
PART II

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to view a larger version.








SUNSET OF
THE WEEK

23.10.08

TIGER DIP

Check out these incredible photos
of tigers swimming with
humans in Miami.

22.10.08

OCTOBER ART
2008

Please click on the images
to view a larger version
.